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Recipe of the Week – Week 21: Bromine

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 21 – bromine  (Br2).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should:

  • Always wear appropriate PPE including eye protection and gloves.
  • Always add acid to water (never water to acid).
  • Use a fume cupboard.
  • Always carry out a risk assessment when using any chemicals.
  • Follow all recommended safety procedures and adhere to the label instructions, hazard warnings and local legislations.

What is bromine?

Bromine is a deep-red, oily liquid with a sharp smell. It is toxic and is used in many areas such as agricultural chemicals, dyestuffs, insecticides, pharmaceuticals and chemical intermediates. Some uses are being phased out for environmental reasons, but new uses continue to be found.

Bromine compounds can be used as flame retardants. They are added to furniture foam, plastic casings for electronics and textiles to make them less flammable. However, the use of bromine as a flame retardant has been phased out in the USA because of toxicity concerns.
Organobromides are used in halon fire extinguishers that are used to fight fires in places like museums, aeroplanes and tanks. Silver bromide is a chemical used in film photography.
Before leaded fuels were phased out, bromine was used to prepare 1,2-di-bromoethane, which was an anti-knock agent.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared bromine.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 20: Ferroxyl Indicator

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 20 – ferroxyl indicator (K3Fe(CN)6 (aq)).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should:

  • Always wear appropriate PPE including eye protection and gloves.
  • Always add acid to water (never water to acid).
  • Use a fume cupboard.
  • Always carry out a risk assessment when using any chemicals.
  • Follow all recommended safety procedures and adhere to the label instructions, hazard warnings and local legislations.

What is ferroxyl indicator?

Ferroxyl indicator can be used to show the process of rusting. When iron atoms begin to rust, they lose electrons to form iron ions. Ferroxyl indicator turns blue in the presence of iron ions. This shows that rusting has begun, even if there is no reddish brown rust showing on the surface of the iron. A pink colour is also produced by the ferroxyl indicator. This shows that the ions being lost by iron are being gained by the water and oxygen that are also involved in rusting

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared ferroxyl indicator.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 18: Calcium Hydroxide

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 18 – calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should:

  • Always wear appropriate PPE including eye protection and gloves.
  • Always add acid to water (never water to acid).
  • Use a fume cupboard.
  • Always carry out a risk assessment when using any chemicals.
  • Follow all recommended safety procedures and adhere to the label instructions, hazard warnings and local legislations.

What is calcium hydroxide?

Calcium hydroxide is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Ca(OH)₂. It is a colorless crystal or white powder and is produced when quicklime is mixed or slaked with water. It has many names including hydrated lime, caustic lime, builders’ lime, slaked lime, cal, and pickling lime.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared calcium hydroxide.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 17: Carbon Dioxide Gas

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 17 – carbon dioxide gas (CO2).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should:

  • Always wear appropriate PPE including eye protection and gloves.
  • Always add acid to water (never water to acid).
  • Use a fume cupboard.
  • Always carry out a risk assessment when using any chemicals.
  • Follow all recommended safety procedures and adhere to the label instructions, hazard warnings and local legislations.

What is carbon dioxide gas?

Carbon dioxide is a colorless and non-flammable gas at normal temperature and pressure. Although much less abundant than nitrogen and oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere, carbon dioxide is an important constituent of our planet’s air. A molecule of carbon dioxide (CO2) is made up of one carbon atom and two oxygen atoms.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared carbon dioxide gas.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 15: Potassium Chloride

Potassium Chloride

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 15 – potassium chloride (KCl).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should:

  • Always wear appropriate PPE including eye protection and gloves.
  • Always add acid to water (never water to acid).
  • Use a fume cupboard.
  • Always carry out a risk assessment when using any chemicals.
  • Follow all recommended safety procedures and adhere to the label instructions, hazard warnings and local legislations.

What is potassium chloride?

Potassium Chloride is a metal halide composed of potassium and chloride. Potassium maintains intracellular tonicity, is required for nerve conduction, cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, production of energy, the synthesis of nucleic acids, maintenance of blood pressure and normal renal function. This agent has potential antihypertensive effects and when taken as a nutritional supplement may prevent hypokalemia.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared potassium chloride.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 13: Ammonia Gas

Ammonia Gas

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 13 – ammonia gas (NH3).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should:

  • Always wear appropriate PPE including eye protection and gloves.
  • Always add acid to water (never water to acid).
  • Use a fume cupboard.
  • Always carry out a risk assessment when using any chemicals.
  • Follow all recommended safety procedures and adhere to the label instructions, hazard warnings and local legislations.

What is ammonia gas?

Ammonia as a gas is colourless and very pungent to the human nose. An aqueous form of hydrogen and nitrogen is used in the production of ammonia hydroxide. Ammonia is often available in nature but is also produced as a fertiliser because it enriches the soil with its nitrogen. You’ll be shocked to know this, but ammonia is produced in the human gut in order to help us digest food with the help of good bacteria. It is also used as an industrial cleaning agent in the majority of industries to clean industrial equipment.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared ammonia gas.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 12: Ammonium Dichromate

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 12 – ammonium dichromate ((NH4)2Cr2O7).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should always wear appropriate PPE.

What is ammonium dichromate?

With a bright orange/red crystal appearance at room temperature and pressure, ammonium dichromate is used within pyrotechnics, lithography, leather tanning and oil purification.  It is thermodynamically unstable and highly toxic. When ignited, a green residue is produced.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared ammonium dichromate.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 11: Potassium Iodide

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 11 – potassium iodide (KI).

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should always wear appropriate PPE.

What is potassium iodide?

An odourless white solid, potassium iodide has been used medically since 1820 and is classified as an essential medicine by the World Health Organisation. As a medication it is used forbreaking up mucus in airways and treating hyperthyroidism, and is used in radiation emergencies – a preventative saturated solution was given to over 15 million Polish adults and children following the Chernobyl disaster. It can also be taken as a dietary supplement for humans and animals with low iodine intake in their diet. Industrially, it is used in film photography when used with silver nitrate to make silver iodide.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared potassium iodide.

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Recipe of the Week – Week 10: Nutrient Broth

Continuing our new series of chemical recipes, we bring you week 10 – nutrient broth.

Remember that when preparing any of our recipes, you should always wear appropriate PPE.

What is nutrient broth?

This is a liquid medium that’s used for cultivating a variety of undemanding microorganisms, providing the necessities required for growth. It has the same formulation as nutrient agar, which we covered in a previous week, except nutrient broth does not contain agar, a solidifying agent, so the broth remains a liquid at room temperature.

Click here to view the PDF recipe card to either save to your local files or add it as a bookmark to your browser.

Scan the QR codes for classroom experiments to follow with your safe and prepared nutrient broth.